See Part 1 and Part 2.

The same afternoon, with a completely different professor, we had a discussion about television and radio. At the end of the afternoon, we had to present a news story to the class. I asked if I could make up my own story to make it more interesting. The professor accepted, which wasn’t very intelligent of him, but it was my first time with this professor and the poor guy didn’t know any better.

Obviously I gave a five minute presentation about the rising number of cows in Canada. Apparently cows from New Zealand are flocking to Canada in droves on boats, but it’s legal because they all have passports. Unfortunately, the cows are taking the place of the garden gnomes and eating all their grass. The Society for the Liberation of Garden Gnomes is on top of the problem, finding new places for the gnomes to live.

At the end of each week of class, there was a quick test on all the different grammar points we had covered. This particular week, we had to write some sentences describing a piece of paper using compound pronouns. Paper isn’t that interesting, but we did our best. For the record, these make wayyyy more grammatical sense in French. I wrote:

“It’s an object without which it would not be possible to write articles about cows in Canada, a place to which many cows are flocking. Cows are a subject of which we often talk. They came to Canada with passports that allowed them to leave New Zealand. In addition, on this paper we can write stories, among which we find the one about the flying cow, which crushed a car and became a celebrity.”

And the guy next to me wrote: “It’s an object on which a blonde American wrote many bizarre stories, including the one about cows in Canada.”

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